Supporting Land and Water Protectors Everywhere

<strong>Standing Rock Sioux</strong>: Thousands of indigenous people and allies are now peacefully camped at the Standing Rock Tribe in North Dakota, protecting the Missouri River and traditional cultural sites from the Dakota Access Pipeline, which is meant to bring fracked oil from the Bakken oil field to the coast for sale, probably overseas.

Standing Rock information – 11/21/16

Where to donate:

  • To sponsor a water protector (bail money etc) go to Paypal and use this address: freshetcollective@gmail.com.
  • Every camp has some kind of fundraiser; Oceti Sakowin is the largest camp: www.ocetisakowincamp.org.
  • There’s an organizer at the camps, who can get money to where it’s needed, if you prefer informal connections. Chas Jewett via Paypal, chasjewett@gmail.com.
  • All the camps have donation options. Crowdfunding sites have a lot of stuff called Standing Rock that is just funding somebody’s trip there, or some particular project – so be cautious.

Bank boycott:

http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/how-to-contact-the-17-banks-funding-the-dakota-access-pipeline-20160929

Wells Fargo, SunTrust, Citibank, Citizens, Comerica, U.S. Bank, PNC, Barclay’s, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and a bunch more.

Minnesota support organizing:

Facebook: Northfield with Standing Rock – there is a lot on this page beyond the local organizing.

MN 350.org , also has a Facebook page.

More?

Current news:

Background Information

Action odds and ends:

  • They ask for prayer support; pray by your local water source; round dance in public places
  • walks, pilgrimages. If you belong to a church or spiritual group, ask them to help.
  • Act to protect your local water, earth, and air; let Standing Rock be the inspiration to protect home.

Other places:

Mississippi Stand:  http://www.mississippistand.com/ – same pipeline, in Iowa, civil disobedience.

Unistoten Camp, in so-called British Columbia, has built traditional buildings in the path of several planned pipelines crossing their territory. They are living traditionally and protecting the land. http://unistoten.camp/

Owe Aku and International Justice Project – Organizing project based in Pine Ridge, SD; recently stopped nuclear mining in the Black Hills. Their website has a great deal of information. Oglala Lakota.

Honor the Earth – northern Minnesota, protecting land, water, ricing beds, threatened by two pipelines and by mining. The Sandpiper pipeline was defeated. Anishinaabeg.

And many more across the continent, around the world.

 

Notes for potential visitors:

http://matadornetwork.com/change/5-things-every-non-native-needs-consider-visiting-standing-rock/

Some words for European settlers who would be allies/accomplices to First Nations land/resource struggles:

1) Don’t make it about you. Ever. For any reason. If it becomes about you then remove yourself voluntarily without having to be “asked” to remove yourself. We are raised from birth to make it about us, part of decolonizing is stopping that pattern.

2) Do not participate in the internal political disagreements of First Nations. Ever. For any reason. Do nothing that would harm unity. Do nothing that would sow discord. Always follow the political leadership of the First Nation whose land you are on. If you find yourself getting too “politically” involved, chop some wood, carry some water, help set up shelters, do some real support work. And if that’s too hard, remove yourself voluntarily and go back to your communities and organize support from there. That’s much harder work to do, and you get fewer cookies and pats on the back, but it’s where the shift needs to happen to change the culture that demands cheap oil and unlimited access to First Nation resources and territory.

3) Don’t get involved for a “spiritual experience.” Don’t go in search of a new name, or a spirit animal, or to become a pipe carrier. We are trained from birth to appropriate, to consume other people’s cultures. Colonization comes from the word Colon, which literally means to digest. You have your own indigenous European traditions to follow. Find those, reclaim those. Bring those authentic songs and traditions to the table IF AND WHEN ASKED TO DO SO.

4) Don’t push agendas. Don’t help out with the intention of being seen as a good person, to post a selfie, or to use the struggle to raise funds for your group. Be clear. Be above board. Be honest. Be humble.

5) Listen more than you talk.

6) You are a guest. You represent your ancestors. Make them proud of your behavior.

7) Help to reign in White privilege and entitlement whenever and wherever it arises. Don’t make your hosts or their allies of color take care of these issues THAT WILL COME UP ALL THE TIME.

8) Attend undoing racism workshops before you plan on spending an extended time doing support work for a First Nations land struggle. There will be orientations for new supporters when you get there, and they’re mandatory, but the more work you do before hand the less of a burden it will be in the camp because you’ll be more prepared to act as an actual ally/accomplice.

Doing this work will change your life and the world.

<li>Here is a 28-minute special report: <a href=”http://trofire.com/2016/09/29/special-report-standingrock-part-laura-flanders-show/”>http://trofire.com/2016/09/29/special-report-standingrock-part-laura-flanders-show/ </a></li>
<li>Here’s a map of pipeline failures: <a href=”http://www.ienearth.org/map-of-destruction/”>http://www.ienearth.org/map-of-destruction/</a></li&gt;
They are calling for people to join them in person. The website includes and address, a phone, and also information on donating.
<strong>Unistoten Camp</strong>, in so-called British Columbia, has built traditional buildings in the path of several planned pipelines crossing their territory. They are living traditionally and protecting the land. <a href=”http://unistoten.camp/”>http://unistoten.camp/</a&gt;
<strong><a href=”http://oweakuinternational.org/”>Owe Aku</a> and International Justice Project</strong> – Organizing project based in Pine Ridge, SD; recently stopped nuclear mining in the Black Hills. Their website has a great deal of information. Oglala Lakota
<strong><a href=”http://www.honorearth.org/”>Honor the Earth</a></strong> – northern Minnesota, protecting land, water, ricing beds, dealing with pipelines, mining, too much to say. Anishinaabeg.
You are welcome to send additional information. It’s most likely to get posted if you write it coherently with valid links, as my time for research and posting is limited.
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